About Ozone

About Ozone

Ozone Clean Green Technology 

The science of Ozone

When most people think of ozone, they picture a thin layer of gas high above the earth’s outermost atmosphere that protects us from the sun’s ultraviolet rays. But this bluish gas, which sometimes is described as that “fresh smell” after a thunderstorm, has a variety of down-to earth uses.

Ozone is a gas. And it’s made of just one thing—oxygen.

Dullet_ventures_about_ozone

“Ozone can be visualized as a regular O2 molecule with a very nervous, active, reactive, excitable, energetic, and lively O1 atom as a side kick. This monatomic O1 atom does not like to be alone, and near the earth’s surface, it refuses to stay with the stable O2 double bond. It is active and reactive, with energy needing to be channeled in some useful direction. It will combine with virtually anything on contact, or at least will try. This active O1 will not stabilize until it can break away from the O2 and form a stable molecule with something else, virtually any other molecule that is available. If no other molecule is available, it will eventually unite with another O1 atom in the same situation, and restabilize as O2. The preceding was adapted from an EPA paper on ozone in drinking water.

Ozone History

• 1893 – Used as a disinfectant in drinking water
• 1909 – Used as a food preservative for cold storage of meats
• 1939 – Was found to prevent the growth of yeast & mold during the storage of fruits
• 1982 – FDA GRAS declaration for ozone use in bottled water
• 1995 – FDA GRAS for ozone use in bottled water renewed without change
• 1997 – Industry Expert Panel declares ozone GRAS and meets FDA requirements. Regulators have the option to later add control on ozone use.
• 1999 – USDA rejects an ozone use protocol for meats, cites 1982 GRAS declaration for water where FDA stated “any other use must be regulated by a Food Additive Petition.”
• 2000 – Food Additive Petition, that addresses both water and air use of ozone, under preparation. FDA estimates approval will occur within six months of submission of the Petition

How Ozone Works ?

Ozone is a gas. And it’s made of just one thing-oxygen. Ozone is a very strong disinfectant and oxidizer. Any pathogen or contaminant that can be disinfected, altered or removed via an oxidation process will be affected by ozone. It is the strongest of all molecules available for disinfection in water treatment, and is second only to elemental fluorine in oxidizing power. Compared to chlorine, the most common water disinfection chemical, ozone is a more than 50% stronger oxidizer and acts over 3,000 times faster. Both chlorine and fluorine are highly toxic chemicals.
For more than a century, ozone has been used in Europe for purifying drinking water. Here in the United States, ozone is used for purifying bottled water and for decontaminating cooling towers. The City of Los Angeles currently uses ozone to purify its water supply. But ozone is not limited to drinking water.

On June 23, 2001, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration officially granted GRAS (Generally Recognized As Safe) status to ozone for use in food-contact applications. With full FDA approval in place, food processors immediately began putting this exciting new technology to use in their plants.

Today, ozone technology is used in the processing of meat, poultry, seafood and fresh produce because it is recognized as the safest, most cost-effective and chemical-free way of dealing with food safety management. Knowledgeable food processors have identified the No. 1 benefit of using ozone—it extends the shelf life of their product—so important in the competitive world of today’s international food industry.

Benefits of Ozone : 

– Ozone is 51% more powerful on bacterial cell walls than chlorine.
– Ozone kills bacteria 3100 times faster than chlorine.
– Ozone is the most powerful broad spectrum microbiological control agent available.
– Ozone eliminates the use of hot water and conventional sanitizer.
– Ozone virtually eliminates all chemical usage.
– Ozone is chemical-free; it produces no toxic by-products.
– Ozone has full FDA-approval for direct-food contact application.
– Ozone is clean and environment-friendly; its only by-product is oxygen.
– Ozone is extremely effective as a disinfectant at relatively low concentrations.
– Ozone is generated on site eliminating the transporting, storing and handling of hazardous materials.
– Ozone is very inexpensive to produce and has an unlimited supply.
– Ozone is much safer for employees than any conventional chemicals.
– Ozone extends the shelf life of food products.
– Ozone permits recycling of wastewater.
– Ozone reduces Biological Oxygen Demand (BOD).

ozon_formulation_image

Generalities :
Ozone (O3) is formed by the combination of three oxygen atoms. An unstable gas with a strong and irritating odor (which explains its name), ozone is corrosive, a strong oxidant and very toxic. For all of these reasons it absolutely unsuitable to sustain life. Ozone is generally produced by generating high-power electrical discharges in air or in oxygen. Naturally found in the upper layers of the atmosphere, where it is formed by a photo-chemical reaction, ozone serves as a shield which protects our planet from the sun’s ultraviolet radiation.

Molecular Weight :
Molecular weight : 47.98 g/mol

Liquid phase :
Liquid density (1.013 bar at boiling point) : 1352 kg/m3
Boiling point (1.013 bar) : -111.3 °C
Latent heat of vaporization (1.013 bar at boiling point) : 316.3 kJ/kg

Critical point :
Critical temperature : -12.2 °C
Critical pressure : 55.73 bar
Critical density : 540 kg/m3

Triple point :
Triple point temperature : -192.5 °C
Triple point pressure : 0.0000114 bar

Gaseous phase :
Gas density (1.013 bar and 0 °C (32 °F)) : 2.141 kg/m3
Specific gravity (air = 1) (1.013 bar and 21 °C (70 °F)) : 1.612
Specific volume (1.013 bar and 21 °C (70 °F)) : 0.519 m3/kg
Heat capacity at constant pressure (Cp) (1 bar and 25 °C (77 °F)) : 0.039 kJ/ mol.K

Supply mode :
Ozone can be supplied by on site generator.

Algae

Bacteria

Achromobacter butyri NCI-9404
Aeromonas harveyi NC-2
Aeromonas salmonicida NC-1102
Bacillus anthracis
Bacillus cereus
B. coagulans
Bacillus globigii
Bacillus licheniformis
Bacillus megatherium sp.
Bacillus paratyphosus
B. prodigiosus
Bacillus subtilis
B. stearothermophilus
Clostridium botulinum
C. sporogenes
Clostridium tetoni
Cryptosporidium
Coliphage
Corynebacterium diphthriae
Eberthella typhosa
Endamoeba histolica
Escherichia coli
Escherichia coli
Flavorbacterium SP A-3
Leptospira canicola
Listeria
Micrococcus candidus
Micrococcus caseolyticus KM-15
Micrococcus spharaeroides

Mycobacterium leprae
Mycobacterium tuberculosis
Neisseria catarrhalis
Phytomonas tumefaciens
Proteus vulgaris
Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Pseudomonas
fluorscens (bioflims)
Pseudomonas putida
Salmonella choleraesuis
Salmonella enteritidis
Salmonella typhimurium
SalmonSalmonella typhimurium
Salmonella typhosa
Salmonella paratyphiSarcina lutea
Seratia marcescens
Shigella dysenteriae
Shigella flexnaria
Shigella paradysenteriae
Spirllum rubrum
Staphylococcus albus
Staphylococcus aureus
Streptococcus ‘C’
Streptococcus faecalis
Streptococcus hemolyticus
Streptococcus lactis
Streptococcus salivarius
Streptococcus viridans
Torula rubra
Vibrio alginolyticus & angwillarum
Vibrio clolarae
Vibrio comma

Virrio ichthyodermis NC-407
V. parahaemolyticus ella typhosa
Salmonella paratyphiSarcina lutea
Seratia marcescens
Shigella dysenteriae
Shigella flexnaria
Shigella paradysenteriae
Spirllum rubrum
Staphylococcus albus
Staphylococcus aureus
Streptococcus ‘C’
Streptococcus faecalis
Streptococcus hemolyticus
Streptococcus lactis
Streptococcus salivarius
Streptococcus viridans
Torula rubra
Vibrio alginolyticus & angwillarum
Vibrio clolarae
Vibrio comma
Virrio ichthyodermis NC-407
V. parahaemolyticus

Fungus & Molds Spores

Aspergillus candidus
Aspergillus flavus (yellowish-green)
Aspergillus glaucus (bluish-green)
Aspergillus niger (black)
Aspergillus terreus, saitoi & oryzac
Botrytis allii
Colletotrichum lagenarium
Fusarium oxysporum
Grotrichum
Mucor recomosus A & B (white-gray)
Mucor piriformis
Oospora lactis (white)
Penicillium cyclopium
P. chrysogenum & citrinum
Penicillium digitatum (olive)
Penicillium glaucum
Penicillium expansum (olive)
Penicillium egyptiacum
Penicillium roqueforti (green)
Rhizopus nigricans (black)
Rhizopus stolonifer

Virus

Adenovirus (type 7a)
Bacteriophage (E.coli)
Coxackie A9, B3, & B5
Cryptosporidium
Echovirus 1, 5, 12, &29
Encephalomyocarditis
Hepatitis A
HIV
GD V11 Virus
Onfectious hepatitis
Influenza
Legionella pneumophila
Polio virus (Poliomyelitus) 1, 2 & 3
Rotavirus
Tobacco mosaic
Vesicular Stomatitis

Fungal Pathongens

Alternaria solani
Botrytis cinerea
Fusarium oxysporum
Monilinia fruiticola
Monilinia laxa
Pythium ultimum
Phytophthora erythroseptica
Phytophthora parasitica
Rhizoctonia solani
Rhizopus stolonifera
Sclerotium rolfsii
Sclerotinia sclerotiorum

Yeast

Baker’s yeast
Candida albicans-all forms
Common yeast cake
saccharomyces cerevisiae
saccharomyces ellipsoideus
saccharomyces sp.

Protozoa

Paramecium
Nematode eggs
Chlorella vulgaris (Algae)
All Pathogenic & Non-pathogenic
forms of Protozoa

Algae

Chlorella vulgaris
Thamnidium
Trichoderma viride
Verticillium albo-atrum
Verticillium dahliae

Cysts

Cryptosporidium parvum
Giardia lamblia
Giardia muris

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